Sponsored Link

スポンサーサイト

上記の広告は1ヶ月以上更新のないブログに表示されています。
新しい記事を書く事で広告が消せます。
Bookmark and Share

Sharaku / Ukiyoe

File:Toshusai Sharaku- Otani Oniji, 1794.jpg
(Otani Oniji II, dated 1794. The Kabuki actor Otani Oniji II in the role of Yakko (manservant))

Tōshūsai Sharaku (東洲斎 写楽, active 1794 - 1795) is widely considered to be one of the great masters of the woodblock printing in Japan. Little is known of him, besides his ukiyo-e prints; neither his true name nor the dates of his birth or death are known with any certainty. His active career as a woodblock artist seems to have spanned just ten months in the mid-Edo period of Japanese history, from the middle of 1794 to early 1795.
File:SharakuTwoActors.jpg
(The two Kabuki actors Bando Zenji and Sawamura Yodogoro; 1794, fifth month)

One theory claims that Sharaku was not a person, but a project launched by a group of artists to help a woodblock print house that had aided them. In this theory, the name Sharaku is taken from sharakusai, "nonsense," and is an inside joke by the artists, who knew that there was no actual Sharaku. The rapidly changing style that Sharaku utilized, with four distinct stylistic changes in his short career, lends credibility to this claim. It was also common for woodblock prints of this time to involve anywhere from five to ten or more artisans working together. However, it seems unlikely that none of them would reveal Sharaku's true identity, or otherwise leave some information about Sharaku behind.
http://www.nhk-p.co.jp/tenran/img/sharaku_3.jpg

Another speculation associates Sharaku with the great ukiyo-e master Katsushika Hokusai. This explanation stems from Hokusai's disappearance from the art world between the years of 1792 and 1796, the period that Sharaku's work began to appear. Beyond giving a reason for Hokusai's absence from the Edo art scene during this time the theory has little evidence.
Regarding his abrupt disappearance, one conjecture is that his master was unhappy with his retainer's association with the demimonde of the kabuki theatre, instead of the more refined Noh theatre which the master supported. There is no evidence supporting or refuting this.
http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_7b1rfJObwq0/S0_GNQoK4pI/AAAAAAAADvo/X33rBgCKFoI/s400/Sharaku+12.jpg

A headman of Kanda area in Edo named Saitō Gesshin (斎藤月岑, 1804-1878) wrote in his supplementary ukiyoe handbook that Sharaku was a Noh actor named Saitō Jurōbei (斎藤十郎兵衛, 1763?-1820). However, as research progressed, the existence itself of Saitō Jurōbei had become doubtful. A Noh actor, usually of samurai rank, would have documents proving his origin, the name of Saitō Jurōbei was not identified in any directory.
http://www.csse.monash.edu.au/~jwb/ukiyoe/sharaku2.jpg

Therefore, numerous hypothesis and opinions have come out for a while who Sharaku was, such as an anonymous prominent ukiyo-e painter, or a publisher Tsutaya Jūzaburō, or if "Sharaku" was the name of a ukiyo-e project by a group of artists, etc.
However in recent years, the existence of a Saitō Jurōbei was recognized in documents that were discovered in Saitama prefecture, which lends more credence to the Saitō Jurōbei hypothesis.

By TS on Jun 23, 2011
スポンサーサイト
Bookmark and Share

tag : Ukiyoe

コメントの投稿

Secre

Twitter
Category
Sponsored Link
Sponsored Link
The Latest Articles
Monthly Archives
Sopnsored Link
Blogroll
Sponsored Link
Link List
Free Area
Link Area
http://www.wikio.com
Counter
ONLINE Counter
現在の閲覧者数:
Ranking
Latest Comments
Latest Trackback
全記事表示リンク

全ての記事を表示する

Profile

T. SATOH

Author:T. SATOH
FC2ブログへようこそ!

RSSリンクの表示
QRコード
QRコード
上記広告は1ヶ月以上更新のないブログに表示されています。新しい記事を書くことで広告を消せます。