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Cool Japan / Kamishibai storytelling takes center stage at Tokyo museum

大道 紙芝居師 くぼたKichirou (Street Paper Picture Show)

The National Showa Memorial Museum (Showakan), in the Kudanshita district of Tokyo's Chiyoda Ward, is holding an exhibition on "kamishibai," the once-popular picture card shows, whose heyday was in the 1930s through 1950s.
File:Kamishibai Performer In Japan.jpg
(A kamishibai artist in Tokyo)

As you might know, Kamishibai (紙芝居), literally "paper drama", is a form of storytelling that originated in Japanese Buddhist temples in the 12th century, where monks used emakimono (picture scrolls) to convey stories with moral lessons to a mostly illiterate audience.

The history of it is as follows;
Kamishibai endured as a storytelling method for centuries, but is perhaps best known for its revival in the 1920s through the 1950s. The gaito kamishibaiya, or kamishibai storyteller, rode from village to village on a bicycle equipped with a small stage. On arrival, the storyteller used two wooden clappers, called hyoshigi, to announce his arrival. Children who bought candy from the storyteller got the best seats in front of the stage. Once an audience assembled, the storyteller told several stories using a set of illustrated boards, inserted into the stage and withdrawn one by one as the story was told. The stories were often serials and new episodes were told on each visit to the village.

The revival of kamishibai can be tied to the global depression of the late 1920s when it offered a means by which an unemployed man could earn a small income. The tradition was largely supplanted by the advent of television in the late 1950s but has recently enjoyed a revival in Japanese libraries and elementary schools. Some Americans have translated traditional kamishibai into English and offer them as part of a "Balanced Literacy" teaching philosophy.

It is now possible to find Street Kamishibai activity also outside of Japan. Artists are presently active in Italy, while in New Zealand, Tanya Batt, a local storyteller/children's author and cycling enthusiast, used it to combine two of her passions and built a replicated kamishibai 'Spoke N' Word' theatre for use by her local community trust.

By TS on Mar 28, 2012
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上記広告は1ヶ月以上更新のないブログに表示されています。新しい記事を書くことで広告を消せます。