Sponsored Link

スポンサーサイト

上記の広告は1ヶ月以上更新のないブログに表示されています。
新しい記事を書く事で広告が消せます。
Bookmark and Share

Cool Japan / Setsubun (節分)

File:Setsubun 2006 Kobe.jpg
(Celebrities throw roasted beans in Ikuta Shrine, Kobe)

Setsubun (節分, Bean-Throwing Festival or Bean-Throwing Ceremony) is the day before the beginning of spring in Japan. The name literally means "seasonal division", but usually the term refers to the spring Setsubun, properly called Risshun (立春) celebrated yearly on February 3 as part of the Spring Festival (春祭 haru matsuri).
http://tryu.cocolog-nifty.com/photos/uncategorized/2011/01/27/b0189321_2315059.jpg
(Beans for bean throwing)

In its association with the Lunar New Year, Spring Setsubun can be and was previously thought of as a sort of New Year's Eve, and so was accompanied by a special ritual to cleanse away all the evil of the former year and drive away disease-bringing evil spirits for the year to come. This special ritual is called mamemaki (豆撒き) (literally "bean throwing"). Setsubun has its origins in tsuina (追儺), a Chinese custom introduced to Japan in the eighth century.
http://putiya.com/youtien/setubun/child_setubun03_c.jpg
(Mamemaki (豆撒き) (Bean throwing) Image at home)

The custom of Mamemaki first appeared in the Muromachi period. It is usually performed by the toshiotoko (年男) of the household (the male who was born on the corresponding animal year on the Chinese zodiac), or else the male head of the household. Roasted soybeans (called "fortune beans" (福豆 fuku mame?)) are thrown either out the door or at a member of the family wearing an Oni (demon or ogre) mask, while the people say "Demons out! Luck in!" (鬼は外! 福は内! Oni wa soto! Fuku wa uchi!) and slam the door, although this is not common practice in households anymore and most people will attend a shrine or temple's spring festival where this is done. The beans are thought to symbolically purify the home by driving away the evil spirits that bring misfortune and bad health with them.
http://blog.sagafan.jp/usr/sagajinjya/%E7%AF%80%E5%88%86s%E8%B1%86%E3%81%BE%E3%81%8D%EF%BC%93%EF%BC%90%EF%BC%85%E3%81%95%E3%82%89%E3%81%AB%EF%BC%95%EF%BC%90%EF%BC%85.JPG
(Setsubun at Shrine)

Then, as part of bringing luck in, it is customary to eat roasted soybeans, one for each year of one's life, and in some areas, one for each year of one's life plus one more for bringing good luck for the year to come.
The gestures of mamemaki look similar to the Western custom of throwing rice at newly married couples after a wedding.

By TS on Feb 3, 2012
スポンサーサイト
Bookmark and Share

tag : Cool_Japan

コメントの投稿

Secre

Twitter
Category
Sponsored Link
Sponsored Link
The Latest Articles
Monthly Archives
Sopnsored Link
Blogroll
Sponsored Link
Link List
Free Area
Link Area
http://www.wikio.com
Counter
ONLINE Counter
現在の閲覧者数:
Ranking
Latest Comments
Latest Trackback
全記事表示リンク

全ての記事を表示する

Profile

T. SATOH

Author:T. SATOH
FC2ブログへようこそ!

RSSリンクの表示
QRコード
QRコード
上記広告は1ヶ月以上更新のないブログに表示されています。新しい記事を書くことで広告を消せます。