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The Native Place Tour of The Tale of Genji / Vol. 41

Introduce "Oharano".
Lying south-west of the old city of Kyoto and on the slopes of Mount Oshio, Oharano is the scene of an imperial procession and a hunt in the Royal Outing chapter of The Tale of Genji.

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WEIGHT OF TRADITION

The News Atticles of Kyoto Shinbun dated 17 Jul., 2008 was felt interesting and I will quote herewith. The title is "Weight of Tradition" and the Subtitle is "Hefty Yamahoko Floats Gion Festival's 32 Floats First-ever Weighing".
Qutoe herewith a part of it.

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Minami-Kannon Yama(南観音山)

As a legend says, "The Kita Kannon Yama is a man, while the Minami Kannon Yama is a woman. Praying for safety of the next day's parade, the Divinity of the Minami-Kannon Yama practices 'Abare Kannon Gyo (where the Kannon statue is swung like a miniature shrine in the midnight parade)'...

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Jyomyou Yama(浄妙山)

The Jyomyou Yama catches the eye with its acrobatic figures. The yama depicts a historic event when a monk warrior, Ichirai Hoshi, leaped over a monk warrior of the Miidera Temple, Jyomyou, on the Uji Bridge to lead the vanguard at the Uji River Battle.

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Kuronushi Yama(黒主山)

The cherry blossoms and pine trees displayed on the Kuronushi Yama create a spring-like atmosphere.

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Suzuka Yama(鈴鹿山)

The old Tokaido route, which connected the old capital area with the eastern area, ran through Suzuka Yama.
One of its chokepoints, Suzuka Toge had many steep paths. Due to this, the area has plenty of historical and notorious episodes as merchants were often attacked by gangs of robbers which may later have been transformed into the Oni, or ogres, of folklore. ...

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En-no-Gyoja Yama(役行者山)

The En-no-Gyoja-yama and the Suzuka Yama are from the northernmost Yamahoko-Cho (the towns that keep the floats). The main figure of the float is En-no-Gyoja who has been popular through the ages because he was a practitioner of Shugen-do...

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Hachiman Yama(八幡山)

It is a wonder that the Iwashimizu Hachiman God participates in the festival for the Gods of Yasaka-shrine.
It is, however, evidence of how deeply people in bygone days believed in the Hachiman God. The splendid gold gilt shrine is said to have been made in the Tenmei period (1781-1789) of the late Edo era.

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Koi Yama(鯉山)

In 1992, the Koiyama Hozonkai renewed the yama's front tapestry, Maekake, for the first time in about 400 years.
A reproduction of the rear tapestry, Miokuri, was made the previous year. Both are 16th century Belgian-woven tapestries, which depict characters and scenes from Greek epics.

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Hashibenkei Yama(橋弁慶山)

The figures on this float depict a scene from a very famous story in Japanese history: "Ushiwaka-maru", a young samurai boy, lightly jumped up onto the round-shaped decoration on the handrail of the Gojo Bridge in central Kyoto, while "Benkei", a big monk-warrior in armor, tried to swing down his pole sword against the boy.

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Kita-Kannon Yama(北観音山)

This float and Minami-Kannon Yama of the neighboring block had alternately participated in the procession every other year from the Onin-no-ran Battle in the 15th century until around 1864.
No other yama or hoko floats participated biyearly in the procession.

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Fune Hoko(船鉾)

The origin of the Fune Hoko (Fune means "a ship" or "a boat") is a story from Chronicles of Japan: Empress Jingu crossed the sea to conquer the Shilla Kingdom on the Korean Peninsula.

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Iwato Yama(岩戸山)

This drawn float is named after two Japanese mythical stories, "Kuniumi"(Making of the Land) and "Ama-no-iwato" (Heavenly Rock Cave) in the "Kojiki" (Record of Ancient Matters) and "Nihon-shoki" (the second oldest history book about ancient Japan).

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Hohka Hoko(放下鉾)

This name comes from the Hohge priest's image enshrined on the deity platform at the middle of the Shingi pole.
The Hohge priest was a priest who did juggling performances on the street while preaching the faith to the people.

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Yamabushi Yama(山伏山)

The name "Yamabushi," a mountain ascetic, comes from the outfit worn by the deity that is carried on the yama.
Among the 23 floats in Saki-no-Matsuri, the first part of the parade, this yama comes from the northernmost town.

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Toro Yama(蟷螂山)

"Toro" means mantis and there literally is a figure of a mantis on the float's roof, and its humorous movements are really loved by children.
The float is based on a Chinese proverb, "Hatchets of a mantis", meaning a weak man standing up against a powerful enemy.

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Hosho Yama(保昌山)

The old name for this yama float is "Hana-Nusubito Yama", or the flower thief's yama. The figure on the yama represents Hirai Hosho (956-1036), grandson of Chief Councilor of State Fujiwara Motokata and son of Fujiwara Munetada.

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Kikusui Hoko(菊水鉾)

The idea for this hoko comes from a Noh chant, Kikujido ('The Boy with Chrysanthemums'). Once, an imperial envoy for Emperor Han Wendi of Wei went deep into the woods to get medicine, where they met a boy.

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Abura-Tenjin Yama(油天神山)

The deity of this yama is a statue of Sugawara Michizane, a late 9th century aristocrat who is identified with "Tenjin" or the God of Thunder. The statue is said to have once been enshrined in the premises of the noble family, Kazahaya, who lived in, and became the origin of, "Kazahaya-cho", the town that owns this yama.

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Shijokasa Hoko(四条傘鉾)

This hoko float made a remarkable comeback to the parade in 1987 after 117 years of absence. It continued participating in the parade even after the 1864 battle fire, but from 1872, it ceased participation and the equipment was scattered and lost.

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上記広告は1ヶ月以上更新のないブログに表示されています。新しい記事を書くことで広告を消せます。